Tag Archives: ink

Ye Olde IKEA Bathroom

neal_winfield_medievalbathroom1

Medieval Bathroom – watercolor and ink, 21 cm x 29 cm (For Sale)

Bathtime

Gothic Bathroom

This time I explored the Medieval bathroom, complete with contemporary fixtures and fittings. IKEA don’t make baths and shower units so I had to look elsewhere for a modern tub. However, the shower curtain, the basket and the toothbrush glass all come from the Swedish furnishers.

Painting the old and new

Again the painting has a typical 14th century palette and I’ve got some gold acrylic paint to replicate the gold leaf commonly found in Medieval manuscripts. These pictures have the feel, colour and style of the original artworks but with the fun inclusion of electric sockets and brass taps. All fitted into impossible spaces, at weird and wonderful angles, just like the International Gothic artists did.

ikea-shower-curtain

IKEA curtain

Gothic furniture

When planning this series it suddenly came to me that IKEA are an excellent choice for the furnishings. Their designs are clean and simple but most of all they are a world renowned brand, instantly recognisable and easy to identify with. Giving their products a Medieval spin but still making them obviously IKEAesque.
Imagining how past things might have been portrayed in a modern light has always interested me. As with images, the same applies to music. Today, would the group Buggles have written YouTube killed the MTV star, instead of the long dead video killing the radio star. Blondie’s classic “Call me!”, most likely would be “Text me!” while Joni Mitchell hails an Uber cab instead of her Big Yellow Taxi. Next up, a kitchen I think.

Painting the Dark Alleyways of Castello

neal_winfield_central_citta_di_castello

The Dark Alleyways – watercolour and ink, 31 cm x 50

The latest painting is of the back streets of Citta di Castello. The brief included a particular doorway, which is down a narrow alleyway, plus three piazzas.

dscn6344Painting the alleyways

The scene needed to take into account the rear of the cathedral, the town’s famous round bell tower, along with three other structures that make up Castello’s memorable skyline.

The tight cobbled streets and strange irregular plan do not give you much room to work with. This area is also quite tall in some respects with high towers, the mass of the cathedral building and the impressive apartment blocks next door. So all in all I think the result is quite pleasing.

storm-009

Stormy purple sky

Colour blind sky

As autumn closes in the weather has turned a little. Gone are the endless blue skies, sun streaked days with scorching afternoons. Instead we’ve been experiencing the odd dramatic thunder storm.

So I decided to answer the question all colour literate people ask. “What colour is the stormy sky in your world?” Well here you have it.  Tell me, who’d swap all of this for a boring, old grey sky? …  🙂

Le Mont Saint Michel – Cathedral in the ocean

Mass San Michel

Le Mont Saint Michel Watercolour and ink 28 x 45 cm (For Sale)

The ancient rocky outcrop at the mouth of the river Couesnon has had occupants going back a millennia. Situated some 600 metres off the coast, near the village of Avranches, its 14 metre tidal range made it a highly defensible site.

Mont_St_Michel_

Mont Saint Michel, Britany

Monastery building

A monastery was first established here in the 8th century but down the years, Mont Saint Michel has been used as a castle and also prison as well.   Victor Hugo was amongst its many political prisoners kept here.

This image of the towering abbey is based around a painting by the Limbourg brothers around the start of the 15th century. Le Mont Saint Michel featured in the lovely Gothic International manuscript Les tres riches heures du Duc de Berry. The original book measured only 29.4 x 21 cm and can be seen in the Musee Conde in Chantilly.

 

The Back of Santa Maria Tiberina

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Monte Santa Maria Tiberina – Watercolour and ink, 74cm x 32 cm (Sold)

Painting Monte

Monte Santa Maria Tiberina is an Umbrian, hill top village that is visible from just about anywhere on the Umbrian, Tuscan border. From it’s lofty perch it looks down on the Upper Tiber Valley, Citta di Castello, all the way down to Umbertide and up as far as Sansepolcro.

Painting Umbrian village

Monterchi – Watercolour and ink 36 cm x 36 cm (Sold)

Piero’s influence

This version was commissioned as a sister painting to the Monterchi study and so they share many similar features. MSMT’s location meant a Piero della Francesca sky was an essential element, while the large feature trees are reminiscent of the masters own style.

The view in reality, mainly, consists of wooded slopes but if you travel along the road from Prato to Monte you find yourself weaving your way around the hills. Climbing ever upwards, past small farms, olive groves and vineyards.

The painting shows the change in the vegetation, which culminates in the cluster of fir trees on top of the hill and the blockhouse structure of the ancient village.

Monterchi Watercolor

Painting Umbrian village

Monterchi – Watercolour and ink 36 cm x 36 cm (For Sale)

Piero territory

Madonna del Parto - Piero della Francesca

Madonna del Parto – Piero della Francesca

Monterchi stands on the Umbrian Tuscan border and is famous for the rare painting by Piero della Francesca of the pregnant Madonna, “Madonna del Parto”. He was born locally, in Sansepolcro and many pieces of his work can be found in the area.

It’s for this reason I decided to paint a sky similar to his “Baptism of Christ” now held in the National Gallery in London. The tree on the left is also a reference to the 15th century painter.

The Baptism of Christ - National Gallery, London

The Baptism of Christ – National Gallery, London

Drawing the landscape

I used some sketches and photos from the Valtiberina painting that were taken looking across the fields from the road to Lippiano.

The colourful town stands out nicely, with a clear sky behind and plenty of trees in the foreground. Although I did a little pictorial pruning of the trees to give a better view of the buildings.

Watercolour of Umbertide Sul Tevere

Umbria towns

Umbertide Sul Tevere  Watercolour and ink, 74cm x 46cm (For Sale)

Painting Umbertide

I wanted to paint this watercolour as I was invited, along with six other artists, to take part in the opening of a new exhibition space in Umbertide. I decided that it would be a good idea to paint a new piece of the town for the show.

Inauguration poster

Inauguration poster

The latest picture of Umbertide was meant as a sister painting to the large one of Citta di Castello

. Taken from a viewpoint of the northern entrance into the town centre, the scene looks across the River Tevere. In the foreground are the road and rail bridges, the old wall and the houses of Piazza San Francesco.

La Rocca

Rising out of this is the old Rocca tower and the strangely shaped Collegiate Church of Santa Maria Reggia to it’s left. Also visible is the bell tower in the main piazza and the curvey facade of Santa Croce, now a museum, which is famous for it’s Luca Signorelli fresco.

The mountains of Acuto and Corona dominate the background with Civitella Ranieri on the third hill. On the tobacco fields behind Umbertide the painting shows the Abbey of Monte Corona and one of the brightly coloured, orange warehouses that litter the landscape around the town.

My sky is normally influenced by the weather at the time of painting and we’ve had some stormy, dark days of late. However, rather than create a grey, somber scene I decided to show the way black, leaden clouds come across as pink and purple to me. Much more dramatic and cheery.

Duccio’s Tree

International Gothic artist

Duccio’s tree

The large tree to the right is a reference to Duccio, whose work I’ve been studying lately in reference to a project on the lost predella of Simone Martini’s picture of Beato Agostino Nouvello, in Siena. I love the way that he realised that there were two elements to depicting trees, the dark green shape of the tree and its lighter leaves.

Umbertide Sul Tevere conveys the feeling of a town situated in a large open plain surrounded by tall mountains and tree covered hills. While linked with the outside world by road, rail and river it is still a busy but tranquil place to live.

Watercolour Painting on the Lake – Isole Maggiore

Lago Trasimeno, Umbria

Isole Maggiore – Lake Trasimeno
Watercolour and ink 35 cm x 21 cm (For Sale)

I’m now working on  a series of paintings around Lake Trasimeno in Umbria, the largest body of water on the peninsula and it’s very own little piece of sandy heaven.

Visiting the Isole Maggiore

Isole Maggiore

Map of the island

The Isole Maggiore, the middle-sized of the three islands, was once heavily populated and a fishing and lace making centre for the area. In it’s heyday there were over 1,200 inhabitants, now though, there are about 16 people who live there permanently.

It is a fascinating place to visit with several restaurants and bars, a museum to the fishing and lace industries that once flourished and the Captain’s House, that tells the story of this fascinating island. You can follow the trails around the islands and visit the cave where St Francis spent some time, there are the ruins of the old mills, and a derelict castle too. Although at the time of writing, this is under repair and inaccessible.

Around Lake Tresimeno

The smallest island, Isole Minore, is privately owned and not open to visitors but the largest, Polvese, is a nature sanctuary. Here you’ll find a couple of old churches, a medieval castle and the remains of a monastery. This is an island on which you can relax, walk around and enjoy the Umbrian countryside and its nature.

Castiglione del Lago

Castiglione del Lago

The area as a whole is full of interesting places to stop off at. The gorgeous town of Castiglione del Lago, the well presented glass museum at Piegaro and the Fishing Museum at San Feliciano provide plenty to see. For a real sense of the history around Lago Trasimeno then the informative Etruscan Museum at Chiusi is worth a visit.

Next up I think the fortifications and churches of Castiglione del Lago.